Pupil Premium Statement 2021-22

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium (and recovery premium for the 2021 to 2022 academic year) funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils. 

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

The total budgeted cost is £123,788

School overview

School name

Marden Primary Academy

Number of pupils in school

287

Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils

29%

Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)

2021-22

Date this statement was published

October 2021

Date on which it will be reviewed

August 2022

Statement authorised by

Mr Niall Dosad

Pupil premium lead

Mrs Nicola Bryant

Governor / Trustee lead

Mrs Debbie Biggenden

Funding Overview

Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year

£112,043

Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year

£11,745

Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)

£0

Total budget for this academic year

£123,788

Statement of intent

  1. Pupil Premium is a government-funded resource paid to schools to meet the needs of disadvantaged pupils. Any pupil who is eligible for Free School Meals now, or has been eligible in the previous 6 years, will receive funding. The funding is also provided to meet the needs of children in care to the Local Authority, children who have recently been adopted from care and children of Service families. The funding paid for each of these groups is different and varies year on year. 

Who is eligible for Pupil Premium? 

  • Children in the Armed Forces Personnel 
  • Looked After Children 
  • Children adopted from care or who have left care 

Children can have free school meals and are eligible for Pupil Premium if they receive any of the following: 

  • Income support
  • Income-Based Jobseekers Allowance 
  • Income Related Employment and Support Allowance (ESA
  • Support under part VI of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 
  • Child Tax Credit provided you are not entitled to Working Tax Credit and have an annual income that does not exceed £16,190 
  • The guaranteed element of Pension Credit 

Why Is Pupil Premium Important? 

Nationally, there is a strong link between economic disadvantage and poor achievement in schools. Across the country, there is a significant gap between the progress made by pupils eligible for free school meals and those who are not eligible. There are many reasons why this gap exists. Pupil Premium is given to schools to help us try to close this gap. It is important because it enables us to counteract the disadvantages that poverty imposes on children. It ensures we can put the support in place to help every child in our school thrive and fully master each stage of the curriculum. 

Pupil Premium Pupils at Marden Primary Academy 

Marden Primary Academy is a school with 30% of its cohort defined as disadvantaged. The main barriers that disadvantaged pupils face are outlined below: 

  1. Limited opportunities to have literacy and writing skills developed and extended outside of school
  2. Limited opportunities for exploring their community and the wider world
  3. Parental and community perceptions of the value of education 

Key Improvement Priorities to close or significantly diminish the gap between pupil premium children and non-pupil premium pupils are:

  1. To improve attendance and punctuality for all pupils to access the curriculum 
  2. To improve access for children to experience enrichment opportunities in the wider world, before, during and after school
  3. To close the attainment gaps and strive to ensure all pupils have the best outcomes possible

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils

Challenge 1

Attendance and punctuality

Challenge 2

To close learning gaps and strive to ensure pupils all have the best outcomes possible

Challenge 3

Ensuring that pupils have full access to a rich and engaging curriculum

Challenge 4

SEND support

Challenge 5

Financial challenges

Intended Outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcome

Success criteria

Improve attendance and punctuality for PP children.

  • Improve absence which is in line with national 
  • Improve persistent absence in line with national averages

Close the attainment gap for PP children across the school.

Smaller class sizes to improve child to adult ratio.

Develop curriculum framework which delivers transdisciplinary learning.

  • Become an IB candidate school 
  • Deliver learning across the school through the Primary Years Program framework

To ensure that all children can access all aspects of school life regardless of cost.

  • We will support with uniform where applicable 
  • We will subsidise access to curricula and non-curricular opportunities to ensure there is equality of access

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £ 49,568

Activity 1

Inclusion Lead £22,039.

Evidence that supports this approach

There is a correlation between the  proportion of PP children who are not at ARE+, who are also on the SEND register and have poor attendance and punctuality.

Challenge number(s) addressed

1

Activity 2

Teacher – £27,475

Evidence that supports this approach

Great capacity for interventions and smaller class sizes have a positive impact on results

Challenge number(s) addressed

2

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £44,360

Activity 1

LSA £20,451

Evidence that supports this approach

Supporting children within class for everyday intervention has an impact not only academically, but also supports social skills

Challenge number(s) addressed

2

Activity 2

PYP Curriculum Development £6,100

Evidence that supports this approach

The PYP will enable our learners to have access to a contemporary, transdisciplinary curriculum. The IB PYP is internationally renowned and has a proven track record.

Challenge number(s) addressed

3

Activity 3

Toddle App £2,474

Evidence that supports this approach

This will help ensure that progress towards meeting the expected standards are tracked and assessed

Challenge number(s) addressed

3

Activity 4

Decodable books £5,000

Evidence that supports this approach

Having access to decodable books across the school but particularly in the lower school will help PP children better access reading.

Challenge number(s) addressed

3

Activity 5

Technology £9,251

Evidence that supports this approach

Our digital strategy will ensure that all PP children in years 3-6 will have 1:1 Chromebooks and 1:2 Ipads in KS1

Challenge number(s) addressed

3

Activity 6

Speech & Language Link Licences & Resourcing £1,084

Evidence that supports this approach

This resource can be used by children independently to help them access learning in class via the use of technology

Challenge number(s) addressed

4

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £28,995

Activity 1

School Uniform £2,500

Evidence that supports this approach

Finances should not be a barrier to all children being able to access education in full school uniform

Challenge number(s) addressed

5

Activity 2

Wraparound Care £1,500

Evidence that supports this approach

We will support working families with wrap-around care if applicable

Challenge number(s) addressed

5

Activity 3

Trips, clubs, events £5,000

Evidence that supports this approach

Finances should not be a barrier to all children being able to access all aspects of school life

Challenge number(s) addressed

5

Activity 4

Attendance support £9,995

Evidence that supports this approach

If children are not at school, they will fall further behind. investing in staffing and intervention to support all learners accessing school is imperative

Challenge number(s) addressed

1

Activity 5

Additional resources £10,000

Evidence that supports this approach

As the year progresses there will be an accessibility fund that can be accessed to support the ongoing needs of PP children

Challenge number(s) addressed

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

Due to COVID-19, performance measures have not been published for 2020 to 2021, and 2020 to 2021 results will not be used to hold schools to account. Given this, please point to any other pupil evaluations undertaken during the 2020 to 2021 academic year, for example, standardised teacher administered tests or diagnostic assessments such as rubrics or scales.

If last year marked the end of a previous pupil premium strategy plan, what is your assessment of how successfully the intended outcomes of that plan were met? 

We utilised the finances to support our children with home learning during the pandemic, this was incredibly successful as we had a large proportion of PP children accessing online learning whilst in lockdown and/or isolating. We did this by investing heavily in Chromebooks for UKS2. 

Attendance and punctuality remained a concern over the course of the year regardless of having a pupil premium champion in place. Therefore, we have innovated the role which has a much larger remit and focuses on SEND, attendance and punctuality and pastoral support. By combining these roles under the area of Inclusion Lead, we hope to have a greater impact on attendance and punctuality. 

The funding was used to support interventions that helped diminish the progress gap for children across the school. This was particularly important when supporting SEMH PP children as a result of the time needed to reintegrate after the pandemic. 

A tutoring programme was successfully implemented across years 4 and 5 to support closing the academic gap in mathematics from the Spring term.